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Sunday
Jan312016

(Guest) Editorial: A Renewed Sense of Possibility

Ephraim Radner

(Photo: Sue Careless)

THE RECENT PRIMATES’ gathering in Canterbury has reignited evangelical energies within the Communion. After several years of desultory news bites, pallid meetings and statements, and occasional outbursts, there was a sense among most Anglicans that Communion affairs and relationships were at best on hold, at worst winding down towards our churches’ disintegrating drift apart. Even The Episcopal Church (USA) and its summer canonical redefinition of marriage to include persons of the same sex didn’t really raise eyebrows. At this point, it surprised no one:  splits among Anglicans on matters of profound human and religious significance were now a done deal. Canada’s September report from the Marriage Commission recommending similar redefinitions, to be dealt with this summer, seemed as inevitable as melting glaciers in the midst of climate change: even if you didn’t like it, there was nothing to do about it.

The real titillation around January’s gathering of Primates, announced this past September by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby, was whether the meeting would finally put a period to the run-on sentence of disarray and dissolution. The main debate was in the secular press, with breathless announcements of the Communion’s planned obsolescence. Anglicans themselves were looking at their shoes. Yes, evangelical energy has been at a low ebb.

As it turned out, however, prayer blossomed

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Sunday
Jan312016

Time, Donne and Death

(Photo: www.shutterstock.com)

 

By David Widdicombe

DEATH IS AN inconvenience. It robs us of the time we thought we had to finish what we thought we ought to finish. And youth is no guarantee of exemption; it is a miracle so many of us survive it. As John Donne, the celebrated 17th century poet and Dean of St. Paul’s Cathedral, puts it:

Death is in an old man’s door, he appears and tells

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Sunday
Jan312016

They Have Arrived!

 

 

Top: St. Matthew’s Church celebrates Tereza’s fourth birthday and welcomes her family to Canada (Tereza is centre front in pink). Above: Syrian refugees from Aleppo – Aroush (holding baby Naroud), daughter Tereza, and wife Marika– stand in St. Matthew’s with Ephraim Radner and Catherine Sider Hamilton. 

(Photos: James Monkman)


By Catherine Sider Hamilton

THEY HAVE ARRIVED! Aroush and Marika, Tereza and baby Naroud: a beautiful family. From Aleppo, fleeing civil war by way of Lebanon, now at last safely arrived in Toronto.

After so many months of working, praying and waiting there were tears on the faces of many as we welcomed this family on Sunday, Jan. 17th, to St. Matthew’s First Ave., in Toronto and to a new life in a country still unknown.

This moment: seeing their faces, exhausted and happy

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Sunday
Jan312016

The Vulnerable Jesus: What a Monk and a Movie Can Teach us about Lent

The Temptations of Christ, a 12th-century mosaic at St Mark’s Basilica in Venice.

By Dustin Resch

He was in the wilderness for forty days, tempted by Satan. 

–Mark 1:13

1988 MARKED the release of Martin Scorsese’s controversial film, The Last Temptation of Christ. The movie was based on the book by the same name, written by Nikos Kazantzakis and published in 1953. Both the book and the movie were banned and publically denounced as heretical by various Christian groups.

The Last Temptation explores what it would have meant for Jesus to be tempted. Though I have not yet read the book, the film, at least, explicitly portrays a very human Jesus who struggles

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Sunday
Jan312016

Grace Abundant: An Attitude of Gratitude

(Photo: Sue Careless)

By Sue Careless

 JANUARY IS SO OFTEN a bleak month after the gift-giving and partying of Christmas. Time to soberly pay all the bills for the festive season and plan a budget for the new year.

This has been made all the harder in 2016 as we learn that the Canadian dollar currently has sunk below 70 cents US, the lowest it’s been since 2002, with more pain to come.

Since 81 percent of vegetables, fruit and nuts are imported from outside of Canada, all of these grocery items are becoming pricier as the loonie falls further. Economists say that the average Canadian household will spend $8,631 on food in 2016, an increase of about $345. The food inflation rate

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