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Tuesday
Dec132016

Taking a Closer Look at some of the images in the Christmas narrative

Adoration of the Shepherds (1622) by Gerard (Gerrit) van Honthorst.

Credit: Art and the Bible

The Manger

By Susan Norman

RECENTLY I have had to re-think my image of “that poor, lowly stable,” which features as the birthplace of Jesus in my favourite Christmas carol. Apparently, the structure itself is unlikely to have been the barn-like building adorning many a Christmas card or nativity set. No stable is actually mentioned in the gospels, just the manger. This trough for feeding animals

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Tuesday
Dec132016

Ox and ass before Him bow

Adoration of the Magi Altarpiece, left hand predella panel depicting the Nativity by Gentile da Fabriano (1423)

Public Domain

THERE IS no ass or ox in the Biblical narratives of the birth of Christ. Yet, besides the Christ Child himself, the ass and the ox are the most ancient elements in the iconography of the nativity. In fact the earliest example of a nativity known to us contains only the swaddled Christ in the manger flanked by the ox at his head and the ass at his feet.

Traditionally, the ox is seen as Israel, and the ass is seen as the Gentiles.  This comes from

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Saturday
Nov122016

Learning from Micah and Mary

 

Both Advent Ember Days readings – which involve the prophet Micah and Mary, the mother of Jesus – have a common theme: that all things will become the Kingdom of Jesus Christ, and that the Lord’s peace will reign. Above: icons depicting Micah and Mary.

By John Deepak Sundara

ALTHOUGH ALL but now forgotten, Ember Days are days dedicated to fasting and prayer in the liturgical year. And both our Advent Ember Days readings, Micah 1:1-4 and Luke 1:26-33 (BCP, p. 100), have a common theme: that all things will become the Kingdom of Jesus Christ, and that the Lord’s peace will reign. Indeed, the coming reign of the Lord is the theme of Advent itself. 

We are counted as those who are to labour for peace and righteousness. Labouring for peace and righteousness is not the call solely of diplomats

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Saturday
Nov122016

Some Reflections on the Consecration of a Bishop according to the Book of Common Prayer

 

Public Domain

The Consecration of St Augustine, painted by Jaume Huguet between 1466 and 1475.

By Sue Careless

Disorganized religion, anyone?

MANY PEOPLE SAY that they don’t attend a place of worship because they hate “organized” religion. But this invites the question: Would they prefer disorganized religion? Part of being organized involves having leaders who must be held accountable to those they serve. “To ordain” comes from the Latin ordinare, “to set in order” or “to arrange” as well as “to rule or regulate.” “Holy Orders” comes from the Latin word ordo or “order.” Freedom, in Western culture, has come to mean the total absence of any authority

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Saturday
Nov122016

Bob Dylan’s Biblical Imagination

Photo: Public Domain


For text of full article, please visit:


http://theweek.com/articles/655168/bob-dylans-biblical-imagination

 

For Further Reading and Listening

“I CONSIDER myself a poet first and a musician second,” singer-songwriter Bob Dylan has said.

Literary critic and scholar Sir Christopher Ricks claims Bob Dylan is the greatest living user of the English language and deserves

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